Welcome to the Textile Resource Center
What does it all mean? Bombazine, barkcloth, bengaline; if it all sounds like text from a Victorian novel, this is the resource for you. The Textile Resource Center (TRC) site is dedicated to free and open access to textile information and education. It contains a textile dictionary and a weave identification guide each with unique images created especially for this site. This growing resource has been and will continue to be, created by a dynamic collection of fabric, design and sewing professionals.

Textile Resource Center

TRC Chatter
Fabric as a stand-in for love.

Fabric as a stand-in for love.

Catherine Bradley 03/09/2015 0
No one is exempt from contact with textiles.  Even nudists sit on fabric-covered furniture, sleep on sheets, dry off with towels, and drive in cars with upholstered seats.  One might even argue that our daily contact with textiles is one of our most immediate and prolonged.  At times they fulfill the needs we expect of them – like protection from t...
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Why do textiles matter?

Why do textiles matter?

Catherine Bradley 03/09/2015 0
In the same way as cave paintings provide clues to early human history, textiles provide clues about cultural heritage, societal preoccupations, and technological innovations.  A pair of 1950’s flannel pajamas depicting astronauts and rocket ships tells us more than just what a little boy wore to bed – it illuminates our understanding of the level ...
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Welcome to the New TRC Site and Blog

Welcome to the New TRC Site and Blog

Kat Lind 23/08/2015 0
Welcome to the new TRC website and blog. As part of the ongoing efforts to improve the usability and functionality of the TRC, the site has been transitioned to a new format. We hope that you like the changes and will find it to be more and more useful as we continute to evolve its content and capabilities....
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About the Textile Resource Center

Textiles play an important part of our day-to-day lives. From swaddling in our first flannel receiving blanket, to the towels we use to dry ourselves off and the upholstered chair we sit on, textiles are woven throughout our life experiences. With such pervasive contact, it makes sense to understand the strengths and limitations of these most intimate relationships. This perspective is what led to the creation of TRC. After concentrated work by a large team, the Textile Dictionary and Weave Guide are now open to view.

 

Many different types of fabrics are currently in the Textile Dictionary. This includes original photographs, common and alternative definitions (if the term has multiple regional uses), common and alternative spellings (as needed), phonetic pronunciation, etymology, and examples of traditional and historic usage. Many of the sample textiles are drawn from a private collection of vintage and antique garments and fabrics that were collected over the last half century. Some of these fabrics are rarely seen outside of museums. Contemporary and readily-available fabrics seen in current garment and interior design construction are also featured. The aim of the textile dictionary is to provide greater understanding of different types and classes of fabrics

 

The Weave Guide is used to identify the most commonly occurring weave types (plain weave, satin weave, twill, etc.) and to understand how each impacts factors such as durability, fabric drape, weight, and design. Each entry contains images of the interwoven yarns, the threaded loom with weave in progress, and commercially available examples. These entries also display a construction diagram and brief look at historical use. To clearly depict the weave structure, the same oversized yarn is used for each sample. This allows the pattern to be highlighted against the same base of color, yarn size, and loom. Using the same yarn for each sample also eliminates any variance in fiber content, surface treatment, or fabric type for greater understanding of the weave’s impact on the finished textile. Additional samples of the weave are shown, executed on a larger loom with finer yarn. This demonstrates the weave’s overall pattern and texture. Commercially available samples of the same weave in different colors and textures are included, along with an explanation of historical context.

 

The TRC is a growing and evolving resource. The next objectives are the development of a Fiber Guide and Needlework Guide.

Contributions

This educational resource was supported by funding generously awarded by the United States Institute for Theater Technology.

This resource would not be possible without the substantial contribution of time, money and expertise by Dragon and Phoenix Software Inc.

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